Seven Natural Wonders of the Philippines

Puerto-Princesa Subterranean River National Park

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The Puerto Princesa Subterranean National Park, where the georgious Underground River is located, has been a Unesco World Heritage Site since 1999. “AMAZING limestone karst landscape with its Underground River” is one of the best descriptions used to describe the Puerto Princesa Underground River.

Hundred Islands National Park

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The Philippines Hundred Islands National Park is situated in Alaminos City, Pangasinan. The islands are dispersed along the Lingayen Gulf and have a total land area of 1,844 hectares or 18.44 square kilometers. There are 124 islands here but one gets submerged in water during high tide.

Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park

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The Tubbataha Reef is situated on the Cagayan Ridge, composing of extinct underwater volcanoes. Being a true atoll structure, it is believed that the atolls of Tubbataha were formed thousands of years ago as fringing reefs and volcanic islands. This is based on Charles Darwin’s theory that atolls are formed when a volcano erupts and afterwards an island is born. When the volcanoes became extinct and the islands subsided over a long time, only the corals remain, growing towards the sunlight. The very big corals seen today surrounding the lagoons are originally the fringing reefs

Banaue Rice Terraces

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A 2,000+ years old terraces that were carved into the mountains of Ifugao in the Philippines by ancestors of the indigenous people. The Banaue rice terraces has been described as the eighth wonder of the world.

It is commonly thought that the terraces were built with minimal equipment, largely by hand. The terraces are located approximately 5000 ft above sea level. They are fed by an ancient irrigation system from the rainforests above the terraces. It is said that if the steps were laid end to end, it would encircle half of the World. And they are still in use today.

The Chocolate Hills of Bohol

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“The group of uncommon dome shaped hills”, is one of the best way to describe Chocolate Hills of Bohol Philippines. It is hard to count how many chocolate hills there are because of it sizes but atleast proximately 1268 hills.

Mount Hamiguitan Range Wildlife Sanctuary

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Mount Hamiguitan is a mountain located in the province of Davao Oriental, Philippines. It has a height of 1,620 metres (5,315 ft). The mountain and its vicinity has one of the most diverse wildlife populations in the country. Among the wildlife found in the area are Philippine eagles and several species of Nepenthes. Some of the latter, such as the Nepenthes peltata, are endemic to the area. The mountain has a protected forest area of approximately 2,000 hectares. This woodland is noted for its unique pygmy forest of century old trees in ultramafic soil, with many endangered, endemic and rare species of flora and fauna.

The Mount Hamiguitan range, with an area of 6,834 hectares (68.34 km2), was declared a national park and a wildlife sanctuary in 2003. In 2014, the park was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

resource:
wikipedia

Mayon Volcano

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Beautifully symmetrical Mayon volcano, which rises to 2462 m above the Albay Gulf, is the Philippines’ most active volcano. The structurally simple volcano has steep upper slopes averaging 35-40 degrees that are capped by a small summit crater. The historical eruptions of this basaltic-andesitic volcano date back to 1616 and range from strombolian to basaltic plinian, with cyclical activity beginning with basaltic eruptions, followed by longer term andesitic lava flows. Eruptions occur predominately from the central conduit and have also produced lava flows that travel far down the flanks. Pyroclastic flows and mudflows have commonly swept down many of the approximately 40 ravines that radiate from the summit and have often devastated populated lowland areas. Mayon’s most violent eruption, in 1814, killed more than 1200 people and devastated several towns. (Description courtesy SI/USGS Global Volcanism Program)

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